Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Montag, 12. März 2018

Postkoitale Gespräche

Und wenn wir schon bei Roth sind, noch eins oben drauf:

--

21.10.1996 Biographien 

Postkoitale Gespräche

Sie spielte große Rollen, er schrieb starke Romane. Nun enthüllt Claire Bloom, wie ihr Leben mit Philip Roth verlief: „folterhaft“.| Der amerikanische Autor Philip Roth, berühmt geworden mit dem Sexjammer-Roman "Portnoys Beschwerden", hat ein Problem: "Ich schreibe Fiktion, und man sagt mir, es sei Autobiographie; ich schreibe eine Autobiographie, und man sagt mir, es sei Fiktion." | Das Problem kann zur Plage werden, wenn der Dichter, was er meistens tut, über Frauen und das andere F-Wort schreibt - und eine Frau zu Hause hat, die ihn liebt und liest und die sich fragt: Was hat da bloß im Kopf, was hat da, nackt und bloß, im Bett des Dichters stattgefunden? | Für die englische Schauspielerin Claire Bloom, 15 Jahre lang Geliebte, 3 Jahre lang Gattin des Autors Roth, steigerte sich die Plage zur Pein, als sie mal ein besonders problemreiches Roth-Manuskript in die Hand bekam. Es barg postkoitale Gespräche, die ein "Philip" mit diversen Frauen führte, und einen Auftritt von dessen Ehefrau: einer Schauspielerin, einer "bemerkenswert uninteressanten", ältlichen Heulsuse mit dem Namen "Claire". | Aus dem Manuskript wurde das Roth-Buch "Täuschung", aus der Manuskript-Claire eine Namenlose. Und aus den Jahren, die Claire Bloom mit dem bizarren Philip Roth zubrachte, wurde das Filetstück einer Autobiographie, die sich Claire Bloom vom wehen Herzen geschrieben und nach Ibsens Emanzipationsdrama "Ein Puppenheim" betitelt hat: "Leaving a Doll''s House" - Abschied vom Puppenheim. (spiegel.de)

--

Claire Bloom Looks Back in Anger at Philip Roth

By DINITIA SMITHSEPT. 17, 1996

Few major American novelists have as eagerly breached the boundaries of fact and fiction as Philip Roth. In book after book he has skirted perilously close to autobiography, naming characters ''Philip'' and turning his own life inside out for public inspection and even condemnation. But now Mr. Roth is playing a role in someone else's book, and the portrait is even less flattering than anything he might have written himself. | Next month, Little, Brown & Company will publish a scathing memoir by Mr. Roth's former wife, the actress Claire Bloom. The book, called ''Leaving a Doll's House,'' paints the author as a self-centered misogynist and tells a bitter if one-sided story of a love gone sour. | Advance copies of the book have been circulating, and the gossip is considerable. Those few friends of the couple willing to speak publicly about their relationship profess that it seemed fine to them. ''He's tense; she's tense,'' Gore Vidal said from his home in Ravello, Italy. ''Each is neurotic. They were together 17 years; it couldn't have been all that bad.'' Like most of the couple's friends, Mr. Vidal is trying to distance himself from the memoir. ''It's always best to stay out of other people's divorces,'' he said. ''And their civil wars.'' | But true to the age of confessional television and tell-all biographies, drawing people into the sometimes unsavory details of a personal civil war is what this book is all about. And as everyone knows, war can be profitable. | Ms. Bloom has a contract from Vanity Fair for ''a lot of money,'' said her agent, Tina Bennett of Janklow & Nesbit Associates. The magazine has forbidden Ms. Bloom to talk about the book until it publishes an excerpt, scheduled for next month, Ms. Bennett said. Holly Wilkinson, a press agent for Little, Brown, said that an article based on an exclusive interview that Ms. Bloom has already given New York magazine would follow. ... (nytimes.com)